• https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009856982302
  • https://plus.google.com/humitsayin@gmail.com/posts

SEXUS JOURNAL

An Interdisciplinary Journal on Sexual Health

visitors
Aktif Ziyaretçi2
Bugün Toplam14
Toplam Ziyaret558798
Web Site Map
Member's Pages

C-RUCK-DRINK-GODDESS

A Drink of the Galaxy:

On Deifying Milk of Goddess

Carl Anton Paul Ruck


 Abstract:  

The obscurantist Hellenistic poet Lycophron referenced the initiation of Heracles as a beast suckling the breast of the goddess Hera. This was the event that was the mythological origin of the Galaxy and of the lily flower that incarnated the same deifying essence as the celestial milk of the goddess and it was the etiology for the domestication of felines. As the Lion of Nemea, Heracles was the greatest of the wild cats. The event of the lactation of Heracles is depicted on four Etruscan mirrors and a Faliscan-Hellenic red-figure krater. The deifying milk-flower of the goddess was a ritual of adoption into the family of the celestial deities, that Hera performed also with two other bastard sons of Zeus, Hermes and Dionysus. As the beast being initiated, Heracles became a wolf. Like the motif of the domestication of the cat, the lycanthropy of Heracles involves the whole family of canines, from the domesticated dog to its wilder antecedents in the wolf and its analogue as the fox. The lycanthropy initiation is a motif of warrior brotherhood widespread among the Indo-European peoples. Both the suckling of Heracles and his lycanthropy implicate bacchanalian rites and the symbolism of the fox pelt headgear of the Thracian Bassarides maenads. The wolf represents the transitional figure in the redefining of Apollo from lykos to lux, and his relationship with his half-brother Dionysus as presiding over antithetical states of mentality or ecstatic communion with deity.

 


KEY WORDS:
 Dionysus, Heracles, Hera, lily, mushroom, wolf, cat

 

SexuS Journal ● 2018 ● 3 (9): 665-710







References

Allegro, J.M.  (1970) The sacred mushroom and the cross: a study of the nature and origins of Christianity within the fertility cults of the ancient Near East. London: Hodder and Stoughton, Ltd.

Archer, G., R. Harris, R.L. and Waltke, B. (2003) Theological wordbook of the old testament. Chicago: University of Press.

Arthur, J. (2003) Mushrooms and mankind: the impact of mushrooms on human consciousness. San Diego: The Book Tree.

Assmann, J. (2005) Death and salvation in ancient Egypt. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, translated from the German by David Lorton.

Athanassakis A.N. and Wolkow, B.M. (2013) The Orphic hymns. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, note 61.

Baines, J. and Malek, J. (2000) Atlas of ancient Egypt. Oxford: Equinox Ltd.

Bettini, M. (2013) Women and weasels: mythologies of birth in Ancient Greece and Rome. Chicago/ London: University of Chicago Press, translated from the Italian of 1998.

Blakely, S. (2006) Myth, ritual, and metallurgy in ancient Greece and recent Africa. Cambridge, UK and New York: Cambridge University Press.

Blechman, A. (2007) Pigeons: the fascinating saga of the world’s most revered and reviled species, Saint Lucia, Queensland: University of Queensland Press.

Bois, G.J.C. (2010) Jersey folklore and superstitions, volume one: a comparative study with the traditions of the gulf of St. Malo (the Channel Islands, Normandy, and Brittany) with reference to world mythologies. Central Milton Keyes, UK: AuthorHouse.

Bonfante, L. ‘(2015) Etruscan mirrors and the grave’, in Haack, M.L. (ed.), L’Écriture et l’espace de la mort: épigraphie et nécropoles à l’époque préromaine. Rome: OpenEdition Books, chap. 11.

Bonfante, L. (1997) ‘Nursing mothers in classical art’, in Koloski-Ostrow. A.O. and Lyons, C.L. (eds.). Naked truths: women, sexuality, and gender in classical art. London and New York: Routledge, p.p. 174-196.

Chantraine, P. (1968, 2009) Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue grecque. Paris: Klincksieck.

onnelly, J.B. (2014) The Parthenon enigma: a new understanding of the West’s most iconic building and the people who made it. New York, NY: Vintage Books/Random House.

Dakaris, S. (1973) The antiquity of Epirus: the Acheron necromanteion, Ephyra-Pandosia-Coassope. Athens.

Daley, J.  (1982) ‘The name of Philoctetes: Philoctetes 670-673’, American Journal of Philology, 103 (4), p.p. 440-442.

Daniel Ogden, D. (2008) Perseus. London and New York: Routledge,

Ede A. and Cormack, L.B. (2012) A history of science in society rom philosophy to utility. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Frisk, H. (1954-1970) Griechisches etymologisches Wörterbuch. Heidelberg: Carl Winters.

Galil, J.  (1968) ‘An ancient technique for ripening sycomore fruit in East-Mediterranean countries’, Journal of economic botany, 22 (2), p.p. 178-190.

Gershenson, D.E. (1991) Apollo the wolf god. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, Journal of Indo-European Monograph Series, No. 8 Institute for the Study of Man.

Gimbutas, M. (1974) The gods and goddesses of old Europe 7000-3500 BC: myths, legends, and cult images. Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press.

Gimbutas, M. (1981) ‘The monstrous Venus of prehistory or goddess creatrix’, Comparative civilizations review, 7 (7), p.p. 1-26.

Graves, R. (1955, 1963) The Greek Myths. New York: Penguin.

Graves, R. (1960) Food for Centaurs (Garden City: Doubleday.

Grummond, B. de (1985) ‘The Etruscan Mirror’, in Notes in the history of art, 4 (2/3), p.p. 28-35.

Haag, H., A., Born, A. van den and Ausejo, S. de (1963) Diccionario de la nibilia. Barcelona: Herder.

Halliday, W.R. (1921) ‘Snake stones’, Folklore, 32 (4), p.p. 262-271.

Harrison, J.E. (1912) Themis: a study of the social origins of Greek religion. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Head, B.V. (1889) A guide to the principal gold and silver coins of the ancients: from circ. B.C. 700 to A.D. London: British Museum, department of Coins and Medals, pl. 36.

Hearth Moon Rising, Invoking Animal Magic: A Guide for the Pagan Priestess (Winchester, UK / Washington: Moon Books, 2013), 133.

Heinrich, C. (1995) Strange fruit: alchemy and religion, the hidden truth. London: Bloomsbury.

Henderson, J. (1975) The maculate muse: obscene language in Attic comedy. New Haven: Yale University Press.

J.-D. Vigne, J.-D., Guilaine, J., Debue, K., Haye, L. and Gérard, P.  (2004) ‘Early taming of the cat in Cyprus’, Science, 304 (9), p. 259.

Kandeler, R. and Ullrich, W.R. (2009) ‘Symbolism of plants: examples from European-Mediterranean culture presented with biology and history of art: June: lilies”: 1893-1895’, Journal of experimental botany, 60 (7).

Kershaw, K. (2000) The one-eyed god: Odin and the (Indo-)Germanic männerbünde. Washington, DC: Journal of Indo-European Studies, Monograph No. 36.

Klapp, “E. (2013) ‘Raven’s bread and other manifestations of fly agaric in classical and biblical literature’, Rush, ed. (2013) Entheogens and the development of culture: the anthropology and neurobiology of ecstatic experience. Berkeley, CA: Atlantic Books, pp. 333-342.

Kobakhidze, E. (2010-2011) ‘The tradition of foster adoption in ancient Mediterranean area and Georgia’, Phasis, 13-14, p.p. 55-59.

Levi, W. (1977) The pigeon. Sumter, SC: Levi Publishing Co., Inc.

Lincott, G. (2017) The complete mushroom hunter, revised: illustrated guide to foraging. Beverly, MA: Quarto Publishing Groups.

McKenna, T. (1992) Food of the gods: the search for the original tree of knowledge. New York: Bantam.

Metzger B.M. and Coogan, N.D. (1993) Companion to the bible. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Morgan, A. (1995) Toads and Toadstools (Berkeley, CA: Celestial Arts.

Mulder, T. (2017) ‘Adult breastfeeding in ancient Rome’, Illinois classical studies, 42 (1), p.p. 227-243.

Piper, A. (2013) ‘The milk of the goat hei∂run: an investigation into the sacramental use of psychoactive milk and Meat’, in Rush J.A. (ed.) Entheogens and the development ofcCulture: tthe anthropology and neurobiology of ecstatic experience. Berkeley: Atlantic Books, p.p.211-177.

Rasmussen, T. (2003) ‘Herakles’ apotheosis in Etruria and Greece’, Antike Kunst, 48, p.p. 30-39.

Ripinsky-Naxon, M. (1993) The nature of shamanism: substance andfFunction of a religious metaphor. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Ruck, C.A.P (1976) ‘Duality and the madness of Herakles’, Arethusa, 9, p.p. 53-76.

Ruck, C.A.P (2012) ‘The great god Sabazios and the crab dance in Athens’, in The Stone Mushrooms of Thrace (bilingual edition, English and Greek) (Alexandroupoli, Thrace-Greece: EKATAIOS, p.p. 193-220.

Ruck, C.A.P (2016) ‘Mushroom sacraments in the cults of early Europe’, NeuroQuantology, 14 (1), p.p. 68-93.

Ruck, C.A.P (2016) ‘The wolves of war: evidence of an ancient cult of warrior lycanthropy’, Neuroquantology, 14 (3), p.p. 544-566.

Ruck, C.A.P, (2018) The son conceived in drunkenness: magical plants in the world of the Greek hero. Berkeley, CA: Regents Press.

Ruck, C.A.P. (2014) ‘The myth of the Lernaean Hydra’, in Goffredo, S., and Dubinsky, Z. (eds.) The Cnidaria, past, present, and future: the world of the Medusa and her sisters. New York: Springer Publishing, p.p. 795-806.

Ruck, C.A.P, Staples, B.D and Heinrich, C. (2001) The apples of Apollo: pagan and Christian mysteries of the Eucharist. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press.

Ruck, C.A.P.  and Larner, R.  (2013) ‘Virgil's Edible Tables’, in Rush J.A. (ed.), Entheogens and the development of culture: the anthropology and neurobiology of ecstatic experience. Berkeley: Atlantic Books, p.p. 387-449.

Ruck, C.A.P. (1976) ‘On the sacred names of Iamos and Ion: ethnobotanical referents in the hero’s parentage’, Classical journal, 71 (3), pp. 235-252.

Ruck, C.A.P. (1976) ‘On the sacred names of Iamos and Ion: ethnobotanical referents in the hero’s parentage’, Classical journal, 71 (3), pp. 235-252.

Ruck, C.A.P. (1978) ‘Documentation’, in Wasson, R.G., Hofmann, A. and Ruck, C.A.P. The road to Eleusis: unveiling the secret of the mysteries. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, reprinted 1998, 2008, p.p. 85-136.

Ruck, C.A.P. (1986) ‘The wild and the cultivated: wine in Euripides’ Bacchae’, in Wasson, R.G., Kramrisch, S., Ott, J. and Ruck, C.A.P. Persephone’s quest: entheogens and the origins of religion. New Haven: Yale University Press, p.p. 179-223.

Ruck, C.A.P. (1986) “The Wild and the Cultivated: Wine in Euripides’ Bacchae’, in Wasson, R.G., Kramrisch, S., Ott, J. and Ruck, C.A.P. Persephone’s quest: entheogens and the origins of religion. New Haven: Yale University Press, p.p. 178-223.

Ruck, C.A.P. (2014) ‘Aristophanes’ parody of Socrates as a pothead and the Spartan warrior cult of the wolf’, in Ellens, J.H. (ed.), Seeking the sacred with psychoactive sacraments: chemical paths to spirituality and God, vol. 1, history and practices. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, p.p. 75-91.

Ruck, C.A.P. (2017b) The great gods of Samothrace and the cult of the little people. Berkeley, CA: Regent Press.

Ruck, C.A.P. (2017c) ‘Cannabis, caves, and plays’, in Estren, M.J.  (ed.), One toke to God: the entheogenic spirituality of cannabis. Malibu: Cannabis Spiritual Center, p.p. 27-32.

Ruck, C.A.P. (2018b) ‘The lady who served the mystery potion: the Eleusinian sacrament personified’, in Baldini, C.  (ed.), Women and Entheogens (Rochester, VT: Inner Traditions.

Ruck, C.A.P. and Larner, R. (2013) ‘Virgil's edible tables’, in Rush, J.A.  (ed.), Entheogens and the development of culture: the anthropology and neurobiology of ecstatic experience. Berkeley: Atlantic Books, p.p. 387-449.

Ruck, C.A.P. and Staples, B.D. (1994) The world of classical myth; gods and goddesses, heroines and heroes. Durham: Carolina Academic Press.

Ruck, C.A.P., ed. (2017a) Dionysus in Thrace: ancient entheogenic themes in the mythology and archaeology of Northern Greece, Bulgaria, and Turkey. Berkeley, CA: Regent Press.

Ruck, C.A.P., Hoffman, M.A. and González Celdrán, J.A. (2011) Mushrooms, myth, and Mithras: the drug cult that civilized Europe. San Francisco, CA: City Lights Books.

Ruck, C.A.P., Staples, B.D., González Celdrán, J.A. and Hoffman, M.A. (2007) The hidden world: survival of pagan shamanic themes in European fairytales. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press.

Scigliano, E. (2005) Michelangelo’s mountain: the quest for perfection in the marble quarries of Carrara. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Singer, C.  (1927) ‘The herbal in antiquity and its transmission to later ages’, The journal of Hellenic studies, 47 (1), p.p. 1-52, llus. p. 16, fig. 12, naturalistic drawing of the first or second century CE, redrawn for the Vienna Dioscorides made for Julia Anicia.

Tanner, L. (2018) Chicago (AP), August 26, 2018, “Mind-altering breast milk? New pot study poses that question.”

Topovov, V.N. (1985) ‘On the semiotics of mythological conceptions about mushrooms’, Semiotica, 53 (4), translated from the Russian by Stephen Rudy, p.p. 295-357.

Tyldesley, J. (2010) Myths and legends of ancient Egypt. London: Allen Lane, Penguin Books.

Valentina Pavlovna Wasson and R. Gordon Wasson, Mushrooms, Russia, and History (New York, NY: Pantheon Books, 1957.

Vermeulen, R. (2015) Natural grazing: practices in the rewilding of cattle and horses rewilding Europe. Available at https://rewildingeurope.com/app/uploads/2015/07/Natural-grazing-%E2%80%93-Practices-in-the-rewilding-of-cattle-and-horses.pdf (Accessed 28 January 2019).

Wasson, R.G.  (1986) “Lightningbolt and Mushrooms’, in Wasson, R.G., Kramrisch, S., Ott, J. and Ruck, C.A.P. Persephone’s quest: entheogens and the origins of religion. New Haven: Yale University Press, p.p. 83-94.

Wasson, R.G. (1980) The wondrous mushroom: mycolatry in Mesoamerica. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Wasson, R.G. (1986) ‘The last meal of the Buddha’,  in Wasson, R.G., Kramrisch, S., Ott, J. and Ruck, C.A.P. Persephone’s quest: entheogens and the origins of religion. New Haven: Yale University Press, p.p. 117-139.

Wasson, R.G., Hofmann, A. and Ruck, C.A.P (1978) The road to Eleusis: unveiling the secret of the mysteries. New York, NY: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, reprinted 1998, 2008.

Werness, H.B. (2006) The continuum encyclopedia of animal symbolism in art. New York and London: Continuum.

Wilson, P.L. (1999) Ploughing the clouds: the search for Irish soma. San Francisco: City Lights.

Wiseman, J. (1998) ‘Rethinking the halls of Hades’, Archaeology, 51 (3), p.p. 12-18.