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SEXUS JOURNAL

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C-RUCK-Thracian-Mystery-Religions



Thracian Mystery Religions

Carl Anton Paul Ruck



 Abstract:  

The ancient Mystery mythological tradition links northern mainland Greece and the islands of Samothrace and Lemnos with Troy, Persia, Boeotian Thebes, Egypt, Crete, Etruscan Italy, the Peloponnesus, Athens, and the sanctuary of Demeter and Persephone at the Attic village of Eleusis. Common to this wide geographical matrix is the role of a psychoactive mushroom as a shamanic sacrament affording access to mystical experience. The Greek Homeric tradition knew of the plant as the Homeric moly, [h]omomi, and the haoma sacrament of the Zoroastrian Magi priests and the warrior brotherhood of Mithraism. This was expressed as a zoomorphic anthropomorphism in the figure of the Gorgon Queen Medusa, and the bovine and taurine metaphors for the Amanita muscaria mushroom. The role of Perseus, as the father of Perses, the eponymous ancestor of the Persians, and of Medea, as mother of Medos, the eponymous ancestor of the Persian tribal group of the Medes, is central to assimilation of the Persian sacrament into Hellenic traditions. Medea is an adjectival version of the same linguistic root that appears in the verbal participle Medusa and the noun Metis, signifying female empowerment though expertise in medicinal and sacred drugs, a wisdom assumed by the goddess Athena as a deification of Sophia. This fungal sacrament figured in the various Mystery cults of the Anatolian Goddess and her male attendant, and in the antithetical relationship of the gods Apollo and Dionysus.

 


KEY WORDS:
 Dionysus Cult, mushroom, Dionysus, haoma, Apollo, Medea, Perseus, ergot

 


SexuS Journal ● 2018 ● 3 (10): 819-854








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